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What to Expect From the National Home Inspector Examination

Home inspection examination

So you’re planning to sit for the National Home Inspector Exam? That’s a major accomplishment, and passing it leads to great things such as licensure. If you’ve got a few butterflies in your stomach, never fear. It’s not as intimidating as it might seem.

Familiarize yourself with the exam procedures before test day and spend a little time in study. You’ll probably do just fine.

Register for the Exam and Pay the Related Fees

You’ll need to plan well in advance before taking the National Home Inspector Exam. Registration can fill up quickly. If you need to test within a certain time period to meet certain licensing requirements of your state, reserve your spot as soon as you can and pay the related fees.

Check the registration page at the Examination Board of Professional Home Inspectors website and find your state. In some cases, you’ll need a special testing center. For everyone else, you can register under the general “PSI Exam Registration” link.

In most cases, the exam costs $225. However, some states may impose a different fee or have separate fees related to the exam. And if you’re a veteran, the fee is reimbursable.

Take it Anywhere Unless You Live in These States

In some cases, the closest testing center to where you live is situated over the border and in another state. Usually, that’s no problem. You can take the NHIE anywhere, with these exceptions:

  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Oklahoma
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Washington State

If you live in any of those states, register with your state-approved and contracted exam administrator.

Home inspection examination

The testing center might be a high-stress environment; exam prep lets you stay cool.

Give Yourself Plenty of Time to Prepare for 200 Multiple Choice Questions

The NHIE consists of 200 questions, they’re multiple choice, and you have four hours to answer them all. According to the Examination Board, questions fall into these categories:

  1. Inspection methods
  2. Home inspection reporting
  3. Building systems, including interiors, exteriors, structure, roofs and more
  4. Professional practice

Your education leading up to the exam should prepare you for the questions asked by the NHIE. But if you’re like most prospective inspectors, you’ll squeeze in some extra study time. At ICA School, we offer exam prep that helps you walk into the testing center confidently.

Don’t take the NHIE Cold, Even if You’re an Experienced Inspector

If your state is implementing new licensing requirements or you want to assess your knowledge and skills for personal reasons, you might take the exam after working for years as a home inspector. Do yourself a favor. Spend at least a little time studying and take a practice exam before the big day.

Not every person sitting for the NHIE is new to the home inspection industry. Some test takers have lots of experience, but experience doesn’t mean you should walk in cold. You might find that you know everything you need to know. But then again, you might find areas where you need a little more study.

If the NHIE is on your horizon, it’s time to get cracking. Reserve your spot, pay the fees and spend at least a few hours in concentrated study. You can always test again if you don’t pass the first time. But who wants to sit for an exam twice? Let ICA School help you prepare, and you won’t have to.

If you’re still just thinking about becoming a home inspector, now’s the time to take that step. Enroll now and start learning tomorrow. Before you know it, you’ll be ready to sit for the NHIE, too.

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